Signs and Symptoms of a Concussion

Signs and Symptoms of a Concussion

Understanding and Responding to a Concussion

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The Center for Disease Control (CDC) breaks common concussion symptoms down into the following four categories:0812893001599692991.jpg

In some cases, symptoms appear right away. In others, symptoms may take days or even weeks to manifest. Contrary to popular belief, less than 90% of concussion injuries result in a loss of consciousness. The symptoms of a concussion can vary greatly depending on the unique genetic makeup and nutritional status of the individual, the force of the blow, and the area(s) of the brain affected. The CDC advises that you seek immediate medical attention if you experience any of the signs or symptoms listed below: 


Danger Signs in Adults: 

In rare cases, a person with a concussion may form a dangerous blood clot that crowds the brain against the skull. Contact your health care professional or emergency department right away if you experience these danger signs after a bump, blow, or jolt to your head or body:

  • Headache that gets worse and does not go away. 

  • Weakness, numbness or decreased coordination. 

  • Repeated vomiting or nausea.

  • Slurred speech. 


    The people checking on you should take you to an emergency department right away if you: 

  • Look very drowsy or cannot wake up.

  • Have one pupil (the black part in the middle of the eye) larger than the other.

  • Have convulsions or seizures.

  • Cannot recognize people or places.

  • Are getting more and more confused, restless, or agitated. Have unusual behavior.

  • Lose consciousness.


    Danger Signs in Children:

  • Take your child to the emergency department right away if they received a bump, blow, or jolt to the head or body, and: 

  •   Have any of the danger signs for adults listed above. 

  •   Will not stop crying and are inconsolable. 

  •   Will not nurse or eat. 

After visiting your medical doctor to rule out a medical emergency, it is time to get to work supplying your body what it needs nutritionally. If symptoms persist beyond 3-4 weeks, you may want to consult with a healthcare practitioner knowledgeable in the areas of functional medicine, neurological rehabilitation, or functional neurology to address residual symptoms. 

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